First course in Health Promotion?

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4 years 1 month ago - 4 years 4 days ago #46 by lwilson

This topic was initiated by Michel O'Neill Ph.D. on 05/05/2012.

First course in Health Promotion?

When was the first course named health promotion taught? It is to settle a bet that Andrew Pasternak, a text book publisher, asked this question about the US situation to Larry Green a couple of weeks ago, which prompted Larry to extend the question to a network of his old friends and colleagues. This generated a flurry of comments and reactions that I thought would be of interest to a much wider audience. With the agreement of all involved, I suggested posting that conversation and to widen it and open it up a bit.

So, when was the first course in health promotion taught in… your university, your country, internationally? As often, the dialogue up to now has been among people from the English speaking health promotion community of countries of the North and maybe we will learn that, internationally, the first course ever taught in Health Promotion was not in 1979 at the University of Toronto (the older one when I posted online the set of messages below), but somewhere in Latin-America, Asia or in another non-anglophone part of the world !!!

So to your memories and old university catalogues all, and we are looking forward to your reactions.

Michel

Michel O'Neill Ph.D.

Consultant et formateur en promotion de la santé/Consultant and trainer in Health Promotion.
Professeur associé/Adjunct Professor, Faculté des Sciences infirmières, Université Laval, Québec.
Expert sénior/Senior expert, TRAASS international, Genève, Bienne et Québec.


Lianne Wilson
Last Edit: 4 years 4 days ago by lwilson.

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4 years 1 month ago - 4 years 1 month ago #47 by lwilson

Le premier cours de Promotion de la Santé ?
Quand le premier cours nommé promotion de la santé a-t-il eu lieu ? C’est pour régler un pari qu’Andrew Pasternak, qui travaille dans une maison d’édition, a posé cette question sur la situation aux États-Unis à Larry Green, il y a quelques semaines, ce qui a incité Larry étendre la question à un réseau de ses collègues et amis. Cela a engendré une vague de commentaires et de réactions que je pensais être d'intérêt pour un public beaucoup plus large. Avec l'accord de tous les acteurs, j’ai proposé d'afficher cette conversation, de l'élargir et de l'ouvrir à tous.
Donc, quand le premier cours de promotion de la santé a-t-il eu lieu dans votre université ..., votre pays, au niveau international? Comme souvent, le dialogue jusqu'à présent s’est déroulé au sein de la communauté anglophone de promotion de la santé de pays du Nord. Toutefois, peut-être apprendrons-nous de votre part que, au niveau international, le premier cours intitulé « promotion de la santé» n'était pas en 1979 à l'Université de Toronto (le plus ancien identifié à date dans les messages ci-dessous), mais quelque part en Amérique latine, en Asie ou dans une autre partie non-anglophone du monde!
Alors tous à vos souvenirs et à vos catalogues universitaires ! Nous sommes impatients de connaître vos réactions.

Michel O'Neill Ph.D.
Consultant formateur et en promotion de la santé / Consultant et formateur en matière de promotion de la santé.
Professeur associé / Professeur adjoint, Faculté des Sciences infirmières de l'Université Laval, Québec.
Senior Expert / Expert principal, TRAASS internationale, Genève, Bienne et du Québec.


Lianne Wilson
Last Edit: 4 years 1 month ago by lwilson.

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4 years 1 month ago - 4 years 1 month ago #48 by lwilson

¿El primer curso de Promoción de la Salud?
¿Cuándo se impartió el primer curso denominado de promoción de la salud? Esta fue la pregunta que hizo hace un par de semanas Andrew Pasternak, un editor de libros de texto, a Larry Green refiriéndose a los EE.UU. para resolver una apuesta. Larry hizo esta misma pregunta a una red de amigos y compañeros de trabajo, lo que generó una marea de comentarios y reacciones que me parecieron muy interesantes para un público mucho más amplio. Con el consentimiento de todas esas personas, propuse colgar esta conversación para ampliarla y extenderla.
Así pues, ¿cuándo se impartió el primer curso de promoción de la salud en… su Universidad, su país, internacionalmente? Como suele pasar, el diálogo hasta el momento se ha producido entre personas de habla inglesa de la comunidad de la promoción de la salud de los países del Norte y tal vez nos enteremos de que, a escala internacional, el primer curso de promoción de la salud no fue en 1979 en la Universidad de Toronto (el más antiguo cuando colgué online el conjunto de mensajes que aparece más abajo) , sino en algún lugar de América Latina, Asia ¡o de alguna parte del mundo no anglófono!
Así que vayan a por sus recuerdos y echen un vistazo a sus catálogos universitarios, pues estamos a la espera de sus noticias.

Michel O'Neill Ph.D.
Consultant et formateur en promotion de la santé/Consultant and trainer in Health Promotion / Consultor y formador en promoción de la salud
Professeur associé/Adjunct Professor/ Faculté des Sciences infirmières, Université Laval, Québec /Profesor adjunto, Facultad de Ciencias de Enfermería, Universidad Laval
Expert sénior/Senior expert/Experto senior, TRAASS international, Genève, Bienne et Québec.


Lianne Wilson
Last Edit: 4 years 1 month ago by lwilson.

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4 years 1 month ago #49 by lwilson

The response was posted by Lawrence Green on 05/05/2012.

I love this kind of question. It forces me to reflect on history I’ve lived, and to cross-examine my assumptions. Without going to any official sources to document this answer, I would be confident in saying that the earliest courses in this country to begin using the term “health promotion” alongside or even in place of “health education” were after passage of Public Law 94-317, “The Health Information and Health Promotion Act” of 1975. It took a couple of years for the government to organize the federal Office of Health Information and Health Promotion as mandated by that Act of Congress, and I was the first appointed Director of that Office in 1979, on leave of absence from Johns Hopkins University. Even I had not been using the term “health promotion” in the title of my courses at Hopkins.

It might be relevant to your bet that the term health promotion was coined by Senator Kennedy or his staff to avoid having the bill referred to an education committee, which is where it would have gone if it had been the Health Education Act. The educational issues were so contentious at that time (with the newly created Department of Education) that a health education bill would never have made it to the top of the Committee agenda. Congress did not define health promotion, so I had no choice but to define it as Director of the new federal Office of Health Information and Health Promotion in the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Health. I presented a definition of health promotion at the International Union of Health Education conference in Dublin early that year, and first published it in the International Journal of Health Education as “any combination of health education and related organizational, political, and economic interventions designed to facilitate behavioral and environmental changes conducive to health.” This helped stake out the broader terrain of health promotion while preserving a central role for health education.
I still can’t say when the first courses might have used the term health promotion in their titles, but I’m sure it wasn’t before 1979, and probably took off after 1986 when the Ottawa Charter on Health Promotion gave it international prominence through World Health Organization initiatives. CDC stuck to the term “health education” for most of those initial years of the 1980s, using the term “health education and risk reduction” to describe their state grants program from the CDC Bureau of Health Education.
That’s probably the best I can do on this topic. The 2nd edition of the Green & Kreuter textbook on the PRECEDE-PROCEED model changed its name from Health Education Planning: A Diagnostic Approach (1981) to Health Promotion Planning: An Educational and Ecological Approach (1991). I think that supported the movement toward renaming of courses, but I have no concrete evidence linking them as cause and effect, just temporal happenstance.

Let me know if you come up with a more definitive answer. I’m copying Marshall, who had a complementary network of instructors in programs outside schools of public health to my largely public health network. He might have a different take on this. He also took up the reigns of the CDC Bureau of Health Education during the early 1980s, and might have a different (more legitimate) memory of their adoption of the term, which would have influenced the adoption by course instructors.


Lianne Wilson

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4 years 1 month ago #50 by lwilson

The response was posted by David McQueen on 05/05/2012.

This is a great discussion. Years back, as you may recall, along with Marshall and some others I toyed with a more formal history of hp. It never came to pass. In any case, Larry, I think you are pretty much on target with the dates of anything formal. I certainly remember the term "health promotion" being tossed around in the mid 70's at Hopkins, but it was not a term that I saw in any formal courses. I remember the debate, that some were saying, "Isn't all public health, health promotion?" and such comments. But this was rather loose. There is little doubt that in the US the term was picked up by those in health education in the first instance. Those of us in the so-called "discipline sciences" (med Soc., behavioral sciences, med anthro., psych, etc) were not using the term hp as commonly. As has been discussed elsewhere, the HP perspective underlying the Ottawa Charter was not so related to the health education model. This is the history that needs more elaboration, however recent special issues on the Ottawa Charter (Hlth. Promo Int.) have discussed in more detail these differences. The IUHPE still retains the word "education" and links to "traditional" health ed approaches, but has dropped education in the name of the IUHPE journal. SOPHE and IUHPE have grown closer over the years.

There are many ongoing dimensions of how the term health promotion is used and what presence it has structurally in academia and government organizations around the world. The story, if not the history, is still being written.


Lianne Wilson

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4 years 1 month ago #51 by lwilson

The response was posted by Marsh Kreuters on 05/05/2012.

Cheers to all!

My goodness – those discussions took place almost 40 years ago!

In the late 70’s Larry and I, along with Kay Partridge and Sigrid Deeds worked on the first edition of what we called the PRECEDE text, entitled Health Education Planning: A Diagnostic Approach. In the second edition, we changed the title to Health Promotion Planning: An Educational and Environmental Approach. I mention that because during the period between those two editions, the discourse about HP (domestically and globally) was very stimulating and productive. When the first edition came out I was still at the University of Utah -- and I recall bringing Larry along with Marc LaLonde out to Salt Lake City where we staged a large public meeting with the governor of Utah to explore how health promotion in the context of the Health Field Concept could strengthen the public’s health. It was a great session. Also, during that same time period, I recall sitting in a discussion group with Ilona (it was either in Copenhagen or Dublin). During that session she made the point that, left unchecked, the rabid commitment to health education ran the risk of “victim blaming” – it was a point well taken.

Often, the “preface” of a textbook goes unattended. In the preface to our second edition (where we changed the title to Health Promotion Planning) we made a special effort to address what we considered to be key health promotion issues. I have taken the liberty to make jpgs of selected pages – they will give you a sense of our thinking at that time. I am not very good at using this technology – I tried to put the pages in order!


Lianne Wilson

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