First course in Health Promotion?

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3 years 4 months ago #58 by lwilson

The response was posted by John Allegrante on 05/05/2012.

I want thank Irv and Larry for getting this rolling and for Michel and others for moving the conversation along. I always find such recollections fascinating--a little like the serendipites that await when walking down narrow streets of an old city with no map--and appreciate the fact that there are still a few us who are interested in preserving the intellectual provenance of our ideas and concepts. I had not commented until now but I am glad to see that Larry has included a reference to our recent commentary in Health Education & Behavior, which, of course, sought to put into perspective the origins of the preoccupation with social determinants in health education (and health promotion) that actually does predate the more recent interest that has emerged, thanks to the intrepid group of scholars we singled out for special mention and others whose work from the 1960s forward set the stage for our modern-day health promotion efforts.


Lianne Wilson

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3 years 4 months ago #59 by lwilson

The response was posted by Lawry StLeger on 22/05/2012.

What a great question!
I was seconded from the Health Promotion Unit in the Victorian State Govt. in Australia to go to Deakin University to establish Australia's first degree in Health Promotion. This happened in 1988. I was the only staff member and stared work by trying to recruit students. Then the next challenge was to obtain reading material for the library and for the students. So little was around but international reports and publications from Europe and North America were collected and put into a large set of notes for the students and me!!!. After one year I needed to engage staff and after 2 years my secondment had finished and I needed to make the choice....academia or government. I chose the former and don't regret it.
Bernie Marshall joined me on the staff and we soon had some people attracted to the department e.g John Catford, Sally Fawkes, Ken Harvey,Evelyn de Leeuw. It was not long after 1988 that postgraduate awards in Health Promotion were offered at Deakin University. And not long after i began my own research in Health Promoting Schools using the settings appraoch which had emerged in the literature. I did a number of consultancies with WHO (WPRO) in collaboration with the wonderful Rosemarie Erben who became a mentor and colleague as we worked on HP in countries as diverse as Cambodia and Mongolia. All this experience meant my teaching improved dramatically and our group were awarded a number on contracts in applied research . Working with John Catford on Health Promotion International in editorial for 14 years was another fantastic experience.
I always believed my students learning outcomes, and the design of HP curriculum was best shaped by our external experiences.


Lianne Wilson

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3 years 4 months ago #60 by lwilson

The response was posted by manmeet on 22/05/2012.

First of all thanks for starting this discussion and roping everyone.
I am an Indian teaching and doing research in the field of research for the past five years. It is quite a new area in the academics of India.We started health promotion as a special course in 2007 in our school of public health. Before this it was part of MD community medicine curriculum only. It was being taught but was never given required weight-age as both teachers and students were more interested in epidemiology. Rajesh Kumar and JS Thakur are other people who are part of the group and are contributing towards health promotion and noncommunicable disease.
Foe me this is more of a learning and little sharing.


Lianne Wilson

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3 years 4 months ago #61 by lwilson

The response was posted by Peter Duncan, King's College London on 22/05/2012.

Postgraduate courses in health education began in the UK (at the London Institute of Education) in the 1950s, but the first course intended to support the formation of specialist health education officers in the UK was begun in 1972 at Leeds Polytechnic (now Leeds Metropolitan University) by Keith Tones, who has occupied a prominent place in UK and international health promotion for well over 40 years. This course was followed by others at Bristol, South Bank Polytechnic and King's College London (the latter being where I now work). At some point in the 1980s, these and other courses that had sprung up in the UK in the interveing period gradually started to change their names to 'health promotion' I am currently doing research on the development of the occupation of specialist health promotion in England and would be glad to hear from other people with an interest in the history of health education and health promotion, whether in the UK or elsewhere. Thank you.


Lianne Wilson

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3 years 4 months ago #62 by lwilson

The response was posted by Michel O'Neill on 25/05/2012.

Heureux de voir que le dialogue est enclenché avec ces trois contributions additionnelles de l'Australie, de l'Inde et du Royaume-Unis. N'hésitez pas à réagir en français ou en espagnol !


Lianne Wilson

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3 years 4 months ago #63 by lwilson

The response was posted by Michel O'Neill on 25/05/2012.

Esperamos comentarios y reacciones en espanol tambien !


Lianne Wilson

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