Action for improved menstrual hygiene management

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3 years 4 months ago #42 by lwilson

The response was posted by Sri on 20/02/2014.

Tanya Santina,
As you mentioned the gaps, I would like to address the first gap:

Definition might vary but the basics of hygiene and use of sanitary products remain same everywhere. The use of the products and how to maintain hygiene like shower, washing, etc are the topics discussed during our workshops and sessions with women.
Changing beliefs is not an easy task as they have been inculcated into the women since their childhood. But certain examples can be cited and quoted for them to understand. I have explained the beliefs related to religious sentiments and menstruation. After the initiation of this discussion, women start associating these and understand the reasoning and can overcome the beliefs and taboos.

Secondly, studies are few and more need to be encouraged but should not be restricted to any particular groups and there is lack of data. We have also found that in developing countries, women are influenced by the local practitioners of medicine both traditional, alternative or gynecologists. Health issues associated with negligence of MHM are whispered among women but have to be discussed in focus interviews and on platforms for gender health.

Thirdly, allocation of funds is very limited and I would be interested to know more about this aspect.
Thank you for sharing your views which are very valuable.


Lianne Wilson

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3 years 4 months ago #43 by lwilson

The response was posted by Aminul Islam on 17/04/2014.

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Lianne Wilson

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3 years 4 months ago #44 by lwilson

The response was posted by david james on 30/04/2014.

Lack of privacy (to use toilets) inhibits change of cloth or napkin for long hours and also proper drying of washed cloth. Insufficient water and lack of privacy causes infections and in many cases leads to infertility.Body Mint Male members of the family are ignorant or insensitive to the needs of women worsening the situation. There have been hints of few hysterectomy surgeries caused by improper or insufficient facilities.


Lianne Wilson

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3 years 4 months ago #45 by lwilson

The response was posted by Tania Santina on 19/08/2014.

Today, I am focusing my discussion on the first shortcoming, namely, the definition of menstrual hygiene, given the relevance of this topic in promoting menstrual hygiene practice.
Before I give my comments, I would like to express my hearty congratulations for your (your and your colleagues’) efforts in developing a new definition of menstrual hygiene management.
However, although this definition has its advantages, it does not explain what the word “adequate” means or provide any specific information on: (a) the type and necessary frequency of changing sanitary napkins; (b) the type of soap to be used to wash the body (e.g., an intimate soap) or the technique for washing the external genitals; (c) the meaning of the word “washing” (for example, does it refer to a full-body wash or to the washing of the external genitals only?); or (d) the frequency of such “washing”.
Having a consensus regarding the definition of menstrual hygiene management is essential for promoting healthy menstrual hygiene practice. This is why, when we attempt to find a clear and precise definition of menstrual hygiene management, it is advisable that it be operational so that we can measure it.
This helps us have a reference for evaluating interventions centred on promoting the practice of optimal menstrual hygiene management. Like any other program aimed at promoting health, “the need to evaluate health promotion interventions, whether for the internal management of programs or for justifying funding or advancing scientific knowledge, is nothing new. It is as old as the field itself” (p. 7).
In my opinion, having an operational definition could close the debate surrounding the epidemiological evidence between the practice of healthy menstrual hygiene and the occurrence of genital infections, a topic that is still not settled, since the current state of knowledge is insufficient for establishing a causal relationship between menstrual hygiene practice behaviours and the contracting of genital infections , , , .
Nonetheless, I can only congratulate you, Mr. Sri, and your colleagues on this step.

References:
1. O’Neill, M. (2004). Le débat international sur l’efficacité de la promotion de la santé : d’où vient-il et pourquoi est-ilsi important ? Promotion & Education 11(1), supp. 6, 6-10 DOI: 10.1177/10253823040110010103x
2. Bahram, A., Hamid, B., & Zohre, T. (2009). Prevalence of Bacterial Vaginosis and Impact of Genital Hygiene Practices in Non-Pregnant Women in Zanjan, Iran. Oman Medical Journal , 24 (4), pp. 288-293.
3. Kisa, S., & Taskin, L. (2010). Behavioral risk factors that predispose women to vaginal infections in Turkey. Pakistan Journal of Medical Sciences , 26 (4), pp. 800-864.
4. Zhang, X., Guo-YingQ.S., Yu-Ling Yu, W., & a, Sun, Y., Yu, G., Dong Zhao, Ye, D. (2009). Risk factors for reproductive tract infections among married women in rural areas of Anhui Province, China. European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, 147, pp. 187–191.
5. Sumpter & Torondel, 2013 Sumpter, C., & Torondel, B. (2013). A Systematic Review of the Health and Social Effects of Menstrual Hygiene Management. PLoS ONE , 8 (4), p. e62004.


Lianne Wilson

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